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Information Literacy: Home

Knowing Good Sources

What is Information Literacy?

Information Literacy is basically knowing good, credible sources from those that are biased, lacking good factual information from untrustworthy sources.

The American Library Association states that an Information Literate person should be able to:

  • Determine the extent of information needed
  • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
  • Evaluate information and its sources critically
  • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
  • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally

Why is it important?

Just look around social media, on television, and in paper sources: Mis-information abounds--it's everywhere! A functioning society requires one that has citizens that are knowledgeable enough to make crucial decisions well. It is everything from purchasing food, headphones, cars, and houses to voting in the next election and raising their children well. So jump right in and increase your Information Literacy.

Information Literacy in the News

LIbrarian Resources

Associate Librarian

Profile Photo
Luann Crosby
Contact:
SCC Campus
928-536-6220

Books

Concise Guide to Information Literacy

This concise but information-packed text helps high school students in upper grade levels and lower division college and university students quickly master the basics of information literacy. A student's textbook and an instructional reference for educators: the second edition of Concise Guide to Information Literacy is both. It teaches students what information literacy is and why it is an important skill to develop--for their schoolwork as well as for success in life outside of school. The guide covers major areas in the information literacy process, including locating, evaluating, and applying information successfully. It also gives professors, teachers, and librarians a flexible text that can serve as the basis of a course in information literacy or research skills, a basic research guide for any information literacy course, or a supplemental text. This second edition has been reorganized for greater ease of use based on the information literacy models consulted. All chapters have been fully updated and now include extended coverage of the topics that appeared in the first edition; additionally, a new chapter on managing information has been added. Serves school and academic librarians and others in teaching basic information literacy skills to students Helps students learn how to find, analyze, use, and process information quickly and efficiently Supplies librarians and teachers with a concise textbook that is useful for student instruction and as a research guide

Good Science, Bad Science, Pseudoscience, and Just Plain Bunk

We are constantly bombarded with breaking scientific news in the media, but we are almost never provided with enough information to assess the truth of these claims. Does drinking coffee really cause cancer? Does bisphenol-A in our tin can linings really cause reproductive damage? Good Science, Bad Science, Pseudoscience, and Just Plain Bunk teaches readers how to think like a scientist to question claims like these more critically. Peter A. Daempfle introduces readers to the basics of scientific inquiry, defining what science is and how it can be misused. Through provocative real-world examples, the book helps readers acquire the tools needed to distinguish scientific truth from myth. The book celebrates science and its role in society while building scientific literacy.

In Defense of Science

Today, only a few people outside of the scientific community are conversant with the tradition of science and its many breakthroughs. The rest are scientifically illiterate. So say Frank R. Spellman and Joni Price-Bayer, authors of In Defense of Science: Why Scientific Literacy Matters. This book explains why ordinary citizens need to have an understanding of science, its methods, and its groundbreaking discoveries. The authors introduce the most basic scientific concepts in accessible and straightforward language. Along the way they debunk several misconceptions of science and scientists, and arrive at a view of science as an integral part of society, policy, and everyday life. The book begins with an introduction to science and its basic concepts, including a brief and entertaining history of science and scientific discoveries, before taking on current views of science in society. It surveys the many sources of our ideas of science, including pop culture, classics of literature, news media, and political discourse. Much of the information from these sources tends to mislead, and the only way to guard against such misinformation is to become scientifically literate, and promote scientific literacy in society. The book therefore delves into the reasons that so many people do not understand basic scientific principles and do not keep up with scientific breakthroughs, and finishes by examining the current state of science education. It includes many resources for further reading, and is presented in an engaging and entertaining way. It offers much food for thought for anyone concerned with science in today's world.

Web of Deceit

For all its amazing benefits, the worldwide social media phenomenon--epitomized by such sites as Facebook, Myspace, eBay, Twitter, and craigslist--has provided manipulative people and organizations with the tools (and human targets) that allow hoaxes and con games to be perpetrated on a vast scale.   In this eye-opening follow-up to her popular 2002 book, Web of Deception, Anne P. Mintz brings together a team of expert researchers, journalists, and subject experts to explain how misinformation is intentionally spread and to illuminate the dangers in a range of critical areas.   Web of Deceit is a must-read for any internet user who wants to avoid being victimized by liars, thieves, and propagandists in the age of ubiquitous social media.

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